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I am a Sir Henry Wellcome Postdoctoral Fellow based at Harvard University and Imperial College London. My research focuses on understanding the organization of distributed brain networks at the level of individuals, and the relation of the networks to cognitive function and dysfunction.

Like a fingerprint, every brain is unique, containing its own arrangement of anatomical folds and functional zones. Because of this, brain imaging tools have to operate at the level of individuals, as preserving each individual’s unique circuitry can reveal important determinants of function. My research has revealed that focusing on the individual can reveal new principles of brain organization, namely the existence of closely juxtaposed parallel networks in human association cortex. I am currently investigating the role that these new network architectures play in cognition at the Centre for Brain Science at Harvard University with Prof. Randy Buckner.

The group-defined dorsal attention (greens), frontoparietal control (blues), and default network (reds) were found to fractionate into parallel closely interdigitated parallel networks when defined within individuals. Adapted from Braga & Buckner, 2017, Neuron.

The group-defined dorsal attention (greens), frontoparietal control (blues), and default network (reds) were found to fractionate into parallel closely interdigitated parallel networks when defined within individuals. Adapted from Braga & Buckner, 2017, Neuron.


My PhD research was supervised by Dr. Robert Leech and Prof. Richard Wise, and focused on the brain networks that are recruited when we are paying attention to different sounds. We found evidence that separable systems serve the orienting of attention to vision and sound, and that these systems interact during natural listening conditions. I also investigated the organisation of distributed networks in group-averaged data and showed that multiple overlapping networks can be detected in association cortex, suggesting that a finer-scale functional architecture exists here that lies beyond the limits of group-averaging. This spurred me to being an exploration of functional anatomy at the level of individuals.

Separable networks observed during top-down attention to auditory and visual modalities. Adapted from Braga et al., 2013, Neuroimage.

Separable networks observed during top-down attention to auditory and visual modalities. Adapted from Braga et al., 2013, Neuroimage.

Eye movements during auditory attention: Listening to sounds in the left and right ears led to differences in natural gaze position. Adapted from Braga et al., 2016, Frontiers in Human Brain Mapping.

Eye movements during auditory attention: Listening to sounds in the left and right ears led to differences in natural gaze position. Adapted from Braga et al., 2016, Frontiers in Human Brain Mapping.